Tag Archives: Thing

It’s a Money Thing // Leasing vs. Financing a Car

To Lease or To Finance: That is the Question!

When it comes to buying a new car, you have three options: purchasing it with cash, purchasing it through a loan (also known as financing) or leasing it. For most shoppers, the decision comes down to buying or leasing.

On the surface, the differences between leasing and buying a vehicle seem fairly straightforward. Leasing a car means you’ll usually have access to a new set of wheels every few years; buying it likely means that you plan to drive the same car for a much longer period of time. Leasing usually includes a warranty that covers most of your repairs; buying means accepting larger repair costs, which are inevitable as the car ages. Leasing agreements can limit your mileage and your ability to customize your ride; buying means you can put as many miles as you want on the car and customize it however you’d like.

Looking only at the comparisons above, you might conclude that buying a car is a more practical and economical option than leasing a car—but if that’s really the case, why are monthly lease payments so much lower (often 40% lower!) than monthly loan payments? Why is leasing considered more expensive in the long term if you’re paying less on a month-to-month basis? To answer these questions, let’s take a look at the concept of depreciation.

Depreciation means a loss of value over time. New cars are a textbook example—you’ve likely heard that a car loses thousands of dollars in value the moment you drive it off the lot. That’s accurate, and that’s depreciation at work (and yes, it can be kind of depressing).

All cars depreciate in value over time, but the steepest drop happens in the first three to five years, as you can see below:
• Brand new to 5 years old—the car depreciates by 15% to 20% of its value each year
• From 5 years to 10 years—the rate of depreciation slows slightly to 10% to 15% of its value each year
• 10+ years—the rate of depreciation tends to level out to less than 5% a year. By this time, the car is usually worth less than one-fifth of its retail price!

Depreciation takes its toll on the value of every vehicle. However, your decision to lease or buy will have an effect on how that depreciation influences your finances.

When you finance a car, you own it once you pay off the loan. This means that you personally take the hit on its depreciation, but it also means you also “own” its residual value. Although that value depreciates over time, if there comes a time when you’re ready to sell it or trade it in, you get the benefit of that resale or trade-in value.

By contrast, when you lease a car, you never actually own it. The company that leases the car to you is responsible for selling the car once you’ve completed your lease term. The leasing company also ultimately deals with the car’s depreciation in value. You get to drive a brand new car without needing to think about its loss in value. That sounds pretty great, right? In reality, even though the leasing company deals with the eventual sale of the car, you’re the one who makes up for its loss in value through your monthly payments. That payment includes an estimate of how much the car will depreciate by the time your term is up. Monthly payments are lower because you’re not paying for the entire car—you’re just paying for how much the car will depreciate in those few years that you’re driving it (a period of time when, coincidentally, the car depreciates the most).

When you finance a car, the monthly payments are higher because you are paying for the entire car, plus interest on the loan. When you pay the loan back, your monthly payments stop (unlike leasing payments, which continue as long as you’re still leasing) and even though your car will have depreciated in value by that point, you will own the remaining value.

As with any major financial decision, there are also other factors that come into play. You need to be realistic about your budget and honest about your lifestyle, and you need to figure out what’s most important to you as a new car owner. How comfortable are you with the limitations set by a lease agreement? How prepared are you to pay for eventual car repairs? Will driving a new car every two to three years be worth thousands of dollars more in the long run? To some people, it might be—it all depends on a combination of your personal needs and preferences.
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Do The Smart Thing Get A Prepaid Credit Card

Many wonder if they should get a prepaid credit card. There are many reasons people sign up for these cards today. Some like the convenience of using these cards. Whereas some use them to build their credit scores back up. In contrast, some use it for both these reasons.

The way a prepaid card works is that a person will sign up for a card, pay a small annual fee, fund it and start using it like a regular line of credit. There are no interest fees associated with the card as there would be with a standard credit card because the owner of the card has funded the card with his or her own money. The money spent with the card prevents the person from going into debt because they cannot spend more than they have placed on the card.

It is accepted in any place which accepts traditional credit cards, and also in ATM’s. This is therefore, a convenient card to use. The card however, helps those with bad credit looking to increase their credit score.

The credit score is very important because it is used to determine whether or not a person will be approved for a loan or line of credit. Also, it determines the amount of interest a person will pay on a loan or line of credit. The higher the credit score, the lower interest rate a person will have to pay. Everyone of course wants to pay the lowest interest rate possible.

People can maintain their high credit score by paying their bills on time. Also, people should strive to keep their available balance over sixty percent of their total line of credit. For instance a person who has a credit limit of ten thousand dollars on one account, should try not to charge more than four thousand dollars on that card in order to maintain a high credit rating.

But for those with a bad credit score, getting a traditional credit card might not be possible. For them, a prepaid card could be the answer. The prepaid card is tracked by the credit reporting bureaus just like the traditional cards.

The person who uses the prepaid cards regularly will typically build up good credit when they use it responsibly. The company that issued the prepaid card will see that this person is being responsible with his or her finances and is likely to report favorably on their credit report. In addition, the issuing company might be so impressed that they offer the person a traditional credit card as well.

People can choose from many card companies. And they should realize that even if their credit history is not perfect, they still need to be treated like a top notch customer by the card company. After all, the card holder turning their money over to this company and is not asking for a line of credit. The company that does not treat everyone with respect should be avoided.

The prepaid credit card is one way to spend money conveniently. And one way to build a high credit score without getting into debt.

Get the information about how you can get a prepaid credit card easy and fast. If you want to improve your credit score, using a prepay credit card will help you to achieve your goals more quickly!

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Why Filing Bankruptcy May Be The Best Thing You Ever Do – Part 1

Thoughts from a Maryland Bankruptcy Attorney

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This is the first of a multi part series. Too often filing bankruptcy is viewed as a failure. In a different way of thinking, a bankruptcy filing opens the door to a better life. In this series, Baltimore Bankruptcy Lawyer Ron Drescher explores various ways that filing bankruptcy may be the best thing a person ever does for themselves and their family.

In this part, Ron discusses the relief that filing bankruptcy brings by moving a debtor’s credit problems into their past and the sense of organization and control that comes with collecting all the documents necessary to file bankruptcy.

Thoughts from a Maryland Bankruptcy Lawyer

Ronald J. Drescher
Drescher & Associates, P.A
4 Reservoir Circle
Suite 107
Baltimore, MD 21208
(410) 484-9000
Fax (410) 484-8120
Rondrescher@Drescherlaw.com
http://www.Drescherlaw.com

FaceTime rondrescher@mac.com
Skype ron.drescher

Practicing in Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, Pennsylvania

Let me be clear. I think a Trustee brings a tons of value to the table when it comes to debt relief. Especially to those people with considerably more debt then assets..

But there are two major flaws when dealing with a trustee, watch the video and learn more
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