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Image from page 391 of “International Studio an Illustrated Magazine of Fine and Applied Art” (1908)
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Identifier: internationalstu10newy08
Title: International Studio an Illustrated Magazine of Fine and Applied Art
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
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Publisher: New York. John Lane Co
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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ith a largelandscape of Indian summer, of greatcharm of handling and knowledge ofpainting, of tender tones and pleas-ing color, with trees against thewarm sky and much mystery, recall-ing well the season, and Roberthung prominently, and what is better, bad things David Cauley has a delightful figure which he callsreceived by right of membership have been ruth- Tanagra, because the lady holds a statuette in herlessly skied and so made as little in evidence as hand. This is painted in great detail, in a scholarlypossible. So radical has been the change that it is manner and is highly personal in color and arrange-enough to make some of the older men turn in their ment. Samuel Woolf, among the youngsters, hasgraves! Rcolutionary men are in prominent an aged Jew at a newsstand, of cleverness andpositions; things that would have been relentlessly interesting disposition of light and shade, whilerejected in former years look down benignly from Luis ]Iora has a couple of athletes, American

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Copyright applied jor by Lillian M. Gciilh THE LARK BY LILLIAN M. GENTH the line; the work of men prominent in the councilshitherto are lost in the shuffle skyward and thecritic is obliged to sit up and take notice! An innovation is in the matter of a number ofcanvases borrowed to make centers, or to add tothe importance of the display. Thus, four portraitshave been secured from owners of the work of JohnS. Sargent and these include his likeness of EdwardRobinson, of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, andthere have been loaned an Abbott Thayer head,work by Horatio Walker, D. W. Tryon, WinslowHomer, J. J. Shannon, Siddons Mowbray and JohnLa Farge. E. C. Tarbells portrait of Dr. Seelye,of Smith College, is here in the center of a panel, Gadiators, showing skill in modeling the nude.Of a truth the portraiture, of which there is con-siderable, while of fair average, is not particularlystriking. The figures are better and include com-positions from Hugo Ballin, A. T. Schwartz, LouisLoeb, Hugh

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Image from page 10 of “Polk’s Indianapolis (Marion County, Ind.) town directory site, 1883” (1883)
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Identifier: polksindianapoli1883unse
Title: Polk’s Indianapolis (Marion County, Ind.) town directory site, 1883
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Authors:
Topics: Indianapolis, Ind. Business enterprises Residential streets Official residences People Government facilities Churches Schools Streets Cities
Publisher: R.L. Polk
Contributing Library: Indianapolis City Directory Range
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Users and Sloan Foundation

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lCemeteries of the and adjoining States. I really do not merely profess, butpractice creativity in design. PLEASE GIVE myself A CALL, DIRECTLY OR with MAIL. Yours Respectfully, W. C. WHITEHEAD, 161 Massachusetts Ave. J. E. Shover. W. F. Christian. SHOYER & CHRISTIAN, CONTRACTORS A BUILDERS Architects and Superintendents. HOME, SIGN AND ORNAMENTAL PAINTERS. MIRRORS, FRENCH PLATE, PIECE, CUT, EM-BOSSED AND CATHEDRAL GLASS. HAMMERED and RIBBED GLASS fop SKYLIGHTS. 124 East Vermont Street, Phone. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. u< 1867. 1883, C.E. COFFIN & CO., REALESTATE MORTGAGE LOANS, ^fcFIRE INSURANCE,*^ * No. 90 East marketplace St., have actually continuously available, on the market or trade, a big a number of HOUSES AND PLENTY, BUILDING PLENTY, FARMS AMD LANDS. ITMORTGAGE EOANS NEGOTIATED AND FIRE INSURANCE WRITTEN ON EOWEST COSTS. Specific interest given to the collection of rents, pay-ment of taxes and care of town home and farms. Reference the finance companies and business males usually of Indianapolis* MONUMENTS!

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Importer of Scotch Granite, -MANUFACTURER OF — ITALIAN and AMERICAN MARBLE MONUMENTS, TABLETS, Etc. New Resigns Constantly Executed by the Most Ex-perienced Developers. No. 70 East Market Street, Contrary Postoffice. X1TI5IAXTAFOI.IS, ZND, 10 MINNESOTA CHIEF SEPARATOR.

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Image from page 449 of “The digressions of V. : written for his own fun and that of his friends / by Elihu Vedder ; containing the quaint legends of his infancy, an account of his stay in Florence, the garden of lost opportunities, return home on the trac
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Identifier: digvwr00vedd
Title: The digressions of V. : written for his own fun and that of his friends / by Elihu Vedder ; containing the quaint legends of his infancy, an account of his stay in Florence, the garden of lost opportunities, return home on the track of Columbus, his struggle in New York in war-time coinciding with that of the nation, his prolonged stay in Rome, and likewise his prattlings upon art, tamperings with literature, struggles with verse, and many other things, being a portrait of himself from youth to age ; with many illustrations by the author.
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Vedder, Elihu
Subjects: American Art
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company
Contributing Library: Whitney Museum of American Art, Frances Mulhall Achilles Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Metropolitan New York Library Council – METRO

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s the eye. This tendency, which unduly cultivatedmight lead me into the extravagant, is held in check by my senseof humour, and has enabled me at times to tread with safety thatnarrow path lying between the Sublime and the Ridiculous, —the path of common sense, which in its turn is dangerously nearto the broad highway of the Commonplace. There is anotherthing — the ease with which I can conjure up visions. This fac-ulty if cultivated would soon enable me to see as realities mostdelightful things, but the reaction would be beyond my controland would inevitably follow and be sure to create images of hor-ror indescribable. A few experiences have shown me that thatway madness lies; and so, while I have rendered my Heaven WILLIAM BLAKE 409 somewhat tame, at least my Hell remains quite endurable. Thusit comes that Blake can wander with delight and retain his men-tal health in an atmosphere which would prove fatal to me; andthus I am not fitted to pass a judgement on him — but I can at

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THE HARDON-GIVING AND IMPLORING HANDS least give a little account which may help do away with that ideathat he was insane. My friend Ellis was a man saturated with Blake. The twolarge volumes, William Blake, by Ellis and Yates, testifyto this. He told me long ago in Perugia that he then thought hehad found the key to Blakes wonderful and interminable mysticpoems. I confess, with the greatest love and veneration for theman and artist, these long poems are to me a veritable Slough of 4io THE DIGRESSIONS OF V. Despond; that in wading through them, when I think I havegained a firm foothold, it sinks from under me, while Ellis goesskipping from hummock to hummock and seems to come out dry-shod at the farther side. And yet, if Blake is ever to be inter-preted, these two men are the only ones who give a promise ofsuccess. It would take a lifetime to really understand Blake; andwhat if after all it should turn out to be — not so. Since I havemade a book that sells, I have frequently been as

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Image from page 104 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902” (1902)
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Identifier: harpersnew0104various
Title: Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 104 December 1901 to May 1902
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: various
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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onder-ing what theyhad to do onearth. A fewstarved dogs,short of ear andtail, are dozingon the pave-ment, and a manin shoes is no-ticed by hisheavier footfall,the majority pa-cing along withghostly noiseless-ness. It is therattling, shabbyequipage, afterall, that is thespasmodic dis-turber of thisunique dream-world; it breaksin on the peaceof a whole neigh-borhood likestage – thunder,tears along anddisappears like acyclone, markingits track with thewrecks of brokensleep and shat-tered dreams.Presently an ele-gant turnout brings in sight a lady dressed in the latestParisian fashion, at the side of a gentle-man in faultless attire. This is varied bya beggar or two, whose pitiful appearancemore than his appeal moves you to lookfor your coppers. The eye lights on abasket filled with those Azorean orangesof which so much is heard; you pick outa few of the Hesperian apples; the boynames three hundred rets as the price,arid you drop the fruit in astonishment.At the hotel a stunning sensation

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A St. Michafi. Farmfr and his Wifk comes at the sound of the amount to bepaid for the accommodation. For two ina room, three thousand rets a day. Hea-vens! with a letter of credit of a shorttwo thousand, in the pocket, you startto compute how many hours you couldstand it in the Fortunate Islands be-fore landing in bankruptcy. The result isa revelation. Having fathomed the valueof the rei, you stand revealed to yourselfas a multi-millionaire. Two thousanddollars exceed three million re is. 88 HARPEKS MONTHLY MAGAZINE. The general impression made by theAzores is that a piece of the enchanted,slumbering Orient has by a miracle beentransplanted to be disenchanted in thisunclassic quarter of the world. At everyturn the Semitic type faces you in castsof countenances either Moorish or strong-ly Jewish. For once you behold Rome,Jerusalem, and Mecca kneeling in millen-nial harmony before the cross. How thiscame to pass need hardly be told. Spainand Portugal have too long intermingledwith the S

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Image from page 238 of “Bell telephone publication” (1922)
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< img alt=" debt cards" src=" http://free-credit-report-check.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/14776246433_8a61f33df7.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Photo by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/126377022@N07/14776246433" > Net Archive Publication Images Identifier: belltelephone7273mag00amerrichTitle:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbelltelephone7273mag00amerrich" > Bell telephone magazine Year:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookyear1922" > 1922(< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookdecade1920" > 1920s) Authors:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorAmerican_Telephone_and_Telegraph_Company" > American Telephone and Telegraph Business< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookauthorAmerican_Telephone_and_Telegraph_Company__Information_Dept" > American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Details Dept Subjects:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksubjectTelephone" > Telephone Publisher:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookpublisher_New_York__American_Telephone_and_Telegraph_Co___etc__" > [New York, American Telephone and also Telegraph Co., and so on.] Contributing Library:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookcontributorPrelinger_Library" > Prelinger Library Digitizing Sponsor:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/booksponsorInternet_Archive" > Internet Archive View Book Page:< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/belltelephone7273mag00amerrich/belltelephone7273mag00amerrich#page/n238/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > Publication Viewer Regarding This Book:< a href=" https://archive.org/details/belltelephone7273mag00amerrich" rel=" nofollow" >
Catalog Entrance View All Images:< a href=" https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/bookidbelltelephone7273mag00amerrich" > All Photos From Book Click on this link to< a href=" https://archive.org/stream/belltelephone7273mag00amerrich/belltelephone7273mag00amerrich#page/n238/mode/1up" rel=" nofollow" > view book online to see this picture in context in a browseable online variation of this book. Text Showing up Prior to Picture:, 1971, areequipped for IDDD; and also several olderESS workplaces have been fitted forglobal phoning. Since mid-Septem-ber, 1972, even more than 180 of thealmost 290 existing ESS officeswere with the ability of supplying IDDD. By1974, the majority of the rest will certainly beso complete and also, certainly, all fu-ture workplaces will have this capability. TSPS promises wider use One more technological innovationbrightening the leads of U.S.customers making internationalcalls is a scheduled change in theprogram of the website traffic service posi-tion system( TSPS ). In the 4th quarter of 1974 once more TSPS program will certainly permitTSPS operators to refine overseasassistance phone calls. Likewise, it will permitcustomers served by step-by-stepoffices to have IDDD service with noadded financial investment in equipment. Itwill minimize the price of modifyingNo. 5 bar switching workplaces forIDDD, and also, at the very same time, it willpermit client dialing of individual, charge card, collect as well as pay-stationcalls. As an outcome of these changes, the year 1975 should see IDDD could -Text Showing up After Picture: pability increased to regarding 25 percent of the Solutions consumers, andmost of these customers will be ableto dial both station

as well as person phone calls. Meanwhile, for theindividuals at A.L. Burbank and Company, one ofthe 3 major shipbuilder-broker-age companies in the world, IDDD hasmeant a savings of time in makingtheir 200 overseas calls a month. For Peter Burbank, it has meantthat and also more. Oh, I value the rate andefficiency of everything– I actually do. Butwhat I miss out on most regarding the wholeoperation is that when I get home, I cant dial overseas myself any-more. Because of the worlds timedifferences, often its moreconvenient for me to call from myhouse. Its then that I realize howmuch I miss IDDD, and also exactly how rapid Igrew used to it. I really desire we hadthis service at our residence. Someday quickly that wish willprobably come true. Richard Burke, that composed this write-up, is a details supervisor at LongLines Head office in Neiv York. Worldwide IDDD obstacle: Of 300 million world phones just one ought to ans Note About Pictures Please note that these photos are removed from checked web page pictures that might have been electronically boosted for readability- coloration and look of these pictures could not flawlessly appear likethe original work.

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Image from page 441 of “The great American book of biography” (1896)
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Identifier: greatamericanboo01mabi
Title: The great American book of biography
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Mabie, Hamilton Wright, 1846-1916 Garnett, William, 1850- [from old catalog] Thomas, Allen Clapp, 1846- [from old catalog] Ellis, Edward Sylvester, 1840- [from old catalog] Birdsall, William Wilfred. [from old catalog] Johnson, Willis Fletcher, 1857-1931 Willard, Frances E. (Frances Elizabeth), 1839-1898 International publishing company, Philadelphia. [from old catalog]
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Publisher: Philadelphia and Chicago, International publishing company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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s,and tried to shield themselves under the cloak of patriotism and loyalty to theUnion. When threatened with exposure and punishment, such men of coursesought to make the party responsible for their deeds, and to involve it in the 438 JAMES G. BLAINE. consequences. The result was the era of scandal of Grants second adminis-tration, when the Credit Mobilier, the Whiskey Ring frauds, and theBelknap episode were brought to light. A passion for investigation fol-lowed. Every prominent public man who manifested any unwillingness to havehis private affairs made public fell under suspicion. Mr. Blaine was too shininga mark to be missed. He was accused of having been bribed with a gift of|Little Rock and Fort Smith railroad bonds, by the Union Pacific Railroad Com-pany, when Speaker of the House, to give a decision favoring that company.He was accused of steaHnsf letters—his own letters—which would have incrim-inated him ; and for years he was pursued with charges of various sorts of cor-

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VS1I1M.1N A.NU JKFFEKSON COLLEGE, WASH 1 .i. 1 ■ … lA. ruption. These charges he completely disproved on the floor of the House,showing that he had bought the bonds, and had lost over ,000 by theirpurchase. After meeting and disproving the slanders against him, he said:— Having now noticed the two charges that have been so extensively circu-lated, I shall refrain from calling the attention of the House to any others thatmay be invented. To quote the language of another, I do not propose tomake my public life a perpetual and unconifortable ilea-hunt, in the vain effortsto run down stories which have no basis in truth, which are usually anonymous,and whose total refutation brings no punishment to those who have beenguilt) of originating them. INGERSOLLS SPEECH. 439 The first charge against him, however, served its purpose. It was made ashort time before the Repubhcan convention of 1876, when Blaine was the mostprominent candidate for the Presidential nomination. For several

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Image from web page 115 of “Agriculture; a text for the college therefore the farm” (1921)
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Identifier: agriculturetextf00bens
Title: Agriculture; a text for college and farm
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Writers: Benson, Oscar Herman, 1875-1951. [from old catalog] Betts, George Herbert, 1868-1934, [from old catalog] joint author
Topics: Agriculture
Publisher: Indianapolis, The Bobbs-Merrill organization
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ecipes. 4. on the go display the correct approach to seed-ing and, whenever equipment is present, the methods of pre-paring seed sleep, disking, fertilizing, etc. 5. Demonstrate tips choose specific grain and oatheads for seed. 6. Wheat and Oat Play Contests Plan and execute here contest games: 1. Variety naming contest. 2. grain and oat judging contest. 3. Recipe offering contest. 4. bread-baking competition. 5. Oral descriptions by course members of a thrashingday yourself. 7. Wheat or Oat Club Project the wheat or oat club makes an interesting method ofstudying the economic creation of these grains. Themembers of the club should arrange to cultivate in one tofive miles, studying carefully the system of follow-upinstruction given by the supervisors of such clubs in yourcounty and state, and maintaining a complete record of all ob-servations, receipts and expenses. The girls can grow a small plat, say one square pole,with a view to studying living reputation for the plant, its cul-

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A club woman witli lier cooking of breads. OATS 97 tural practices, and its use for food products. In connectionwith domestic-science work, girls can get ready for ex-hibit functions the different dishes feasible from oat andbake a loaf of wheat breads for the school display eachmonth. This makes a fascinating demonstration for Fri-day mid-day programs. For a basis of honor in prize contests or even for credit rat-ings on home jobs and club work, we suggest thatyou secure tips of the Supervisor of Agri-cultural and Flome Economic Education in your condition, andalso get assistance from your State commander of Boys and GirlsExtension Perform. Inside absence of their help, the followingwill be helpful: Home and Club Project Score Card 1. Yield and quality of produclion 30 2. web revenue on financial investment 30 3. Exhibit of whole grain and products 20 4. Crop records and story of work 20 Total rating, if perfect 100 Suggestions have actually people in the class outline some ten demon-strations with oats, f

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Image from page 13 of “Academiae Caesareo-Leopoldinae Naturae Curiosorum Ephemerides.” (1720)
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Identifier: academiaecaesare08fran
Title: Academiae Caesareo-Leopoldinae Naturae Curiosorum Ephemerides.
Year: 1720 (1720s)
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Publisher: Francoforti
Contributing Library: Natural History Museum Library, London
Digitizing Sponsor: Natural History Museum Library, London

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Vfpkiis MAIESTATIS VE-STRAE, CAROLE, Imperan-tium Maxime, quartum nunc inconfpettum orbis exponere li-cuijfe Ephemeridum Centurias novas, Aca-demia Augutto Veflro Nomine decorata, eoimpenfiusfibi gratulatur,quofrequentiorajtu-dii, mediocris licet, non tamen in rerum medi-carum et reconditae naturae fcrutinio un-quam otiofiy experimenta et quo certiora proimmortalibus Heri Sui Clementiffimi in femeritis, quae nulla unquam apud ipfam delebitobliuio, memoris gratiffimaeque uoluntatisfymbola, devofijjimaeque fubmiffionis boji-menta, exhibere valef, Etenim fot tantisqueImperatoriae Gratiae documenfis, quorum nume- (o) nwncrum inire dijficile>au8a et orn&ta cumfitfacile intelligi-mus^fplendidifpmo boc benefaSorum jubare noscoUuftrariideo,utin quamplurimos illudjpargatur opportunitatispublucaecommodo, etutomnesCAESARIS IndulgentiJJimicu-ra,providentia,virtute etfapientia, capita fortunasque Juasdefendi,acfummaergacunSos benignitatefoveri experian-tiir. AIAIESTATI VESTRAE parum videbat

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Image from page 37 of “Negro slavery in the northern colonies” (1902)
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Identifier: negroslaveryinno00bogg
Title: Negro slavery in the northern colonies
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Boggess, Arthur Clinton
Subjects: Slavery Theses
Publisher:
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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slaves are set down to Massachusetts.This return, made: by the marshal!, of the district, may be consideredas the formal evidence of the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts,especially as no person as appeared to contest the legality of thereturns. M. H. S. Coll. I, IV, 199, 204. It is scarcely proba-ble that none of these negroes and raulattoes were held as slaves,although many had been manumitted, and traffic in slaves had beenforbidden in Massachusetts in 1788.^ Vermont is credited with 17 slaves. This was the result ofa clerical error, and was officially corrected in 1870.^ The census of 1790 gave the number of free blacks as 59527.These were about equally divided between free states and slave states.The colored element at this census constituted ifg larger proportionof the population than ever after, viz., 19.3 percent. 1. Hist, of Slavery in Mass., 247. 2. Ibid, 125. 3. Ibid, 226. 4. New Eng. Hist, and Geneal. Regiater XIIX, 248. || 5. Amer. Statistical Assn Pub., 1890-91, 93.

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For the sake of comparison a few statistics of the number ofslaves elsewhere than in the northern colonies are given. The Lordsof Trade in 1721 reported: in South Carolina, 9000 whites and 12000 blacks;in North Carolina, 1600 inhabitants of which about one third a. 3.were blacks; in Maryland, 34796 whites, 7935 negroes; in Pennsyl-vania, 60000 whites and 5000 blacks, although others are said to haveestimated not more than half this number. In 1764, Colonel Bradstreet wrote:lam assured by persons late-ly from Illinois, that exclusively of the French Garrisons there,the Inhabitants are 600 fighting Men, have one thousand Negroes well-accustomed to the use of small arms, averse to our taking possession sr. of the country. The number of negro slaves bartered for in one yeai? ( 1768) on the coast of Africa, from Cape Blanco to Rio Congo, by the different European nations, amounts as follows: Great Britain, 53,100; British Americans, 6,300; France, 23,520; Holland, 11,300; Portugal, 1,700;

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