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Image from page 645 of “Industrial history of the United States, from the earliest settlements to the present time: being a complete survey of American industries, embracing agriculture and horticulture; including the cultivation of cotton, tobacco, wheat
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Identifier: industrialhistor00boll
Title: Industrial history of the United States, from the earliest settlements to the present time: being a complete survey of American industries, embracing agriculture and horticulture; including the cultivation of cotton, tobacco, wheat; the raising of horses, neat-cattle, etc.; all the important manufactures, shipping and fisheries, railroads, mines and mining, and oil; also a history of the coal-miners and the Molly Maguires; banks, insurance, and commerce; trade-unions, strikes, and eight-hour movement; together with a description of Canadian industries
Year: 1878 (1870s)
Authors: Bolles, Albert Sidney, 1846-1939
Subjects: Industries Industries
Publisher: Norwich, Conn. : The Henry Bill pub. Company
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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y. The problem of thelocomotive was solved in 1834 by 44 The Lancasterof Mr. Baldwins make, and Pennsylvania resolved to adopt that sort of motive-power for her railroad to Columbia. But eventhen there were many things about an engine not understood; and constantexperiment and expenditure of money had to be resorted to before the requi-site knowledge was obtained. In order to facilitate the building of railroads, the States at first extended 630 INDUSTRIAL HISTORY to the companies building them direct aid either from the public treasury, orGranting of by a loan of the public credit. There was a generous glow ofpublic aid. interest in them in the public mind. The patriots never gatheredfor a Fourth-of-July celebration or a public dinner without drinking a heartytoast to internal improvements. The papers were full of rhapsodies upon themarch of the new idea; and orators in public assemblages, and in the capitolsof the state and nation, felt that they had well earned the public gratitude

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INTERIOR OF SLEEPING-CAR. by the ardor of their advocacy of railroads, canals, and military roads.Such being the state of the public mind, every railroad enterprise wisely con-ceived and prudently conducted found it easy to obtain State aid to suchreasonable amount as would enable its promoters to accomplish their work.Maryland was the first State in the country to grant legislative aid to railroads.In 1828 the sum of 0,000 was granted to the Baltimore and Ohio line;and in 1835 the State subscribed ,000,000 to the stock of the company,and the city of Baltimore ,000,000 more. Massachusetts loaned ,000,000 OF THE UNITED STATES. 631 to the Boston and Albany line. New York followed her example by loaningsmall sums to the different companies building the chain of roads out to LakeErie, — a step which the panic of 1837 made necessary in part, since it dis-couraged the investment of private capital. Pennsylvania went so far as tobuild her first rail-route from Philadelphia to Colu

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